(via raquelfromtelevisionrepair)

ewatsondaily:

"I decided that I was a feminist. This seemed uncomplicated to me. But my recent research has shown me that feminism has become an unpopular word. Women are choosing not to identify as feminists. Apparently, [women’s expression is] seen as too strong, too aggressive, anti-men, unattractive."

ewatsondaily:

"I decided that I was a feminist. This seemed uncomplicated to me. But my recent research has shown me that feminism has become an unpopular word. Women are choosing not to identify as feminists. Apparently, [women’s expression is] seen as too strong, too aggressive, anti-men, unattractive."

(via piplusme)

humansofnewyork:

Just two baby monkeys hugging.
(Kathmandu, Nepal)

humansofnewyork:

Just two baby monkeys hugging.

(Kathmandu, Nepal)

(Source: inspired-for-lifee, via candidlycara)

mypubliclands:

In Walking with Giants, we follow 167-million-year-old dinosaur tracks in the ancient ocean shores of…Wyoming?

For part of the Middle Jurassic, Wyoming was covered periodically by an ancient ocean called the Sundance Sea. Until the tracks were found, scientists thought that only sea-dwelling creatures could have lived in the area which would mean there shouldn’t be any dinosaur footprints here at all. But there are thousands of tracks in the 40-acre area. 

CLICK HERE to read Walking with Giants - a feature article by Sarah Beckwith in the BLM’s My Public Lands Magazine, Summer 2014

(via scinerds)

humansofnewyork:

"When he first came to us, he wasn’t talking. He was about four years old, but we knew nothing else about him. Occasionally, he’d imitate the other children, but he’d express no thoughts of his own. He couldn’t tell us anything about his home, his family, or where he came from. To make matters worse, aid workers had further confused him by suggesting hometowns to him— which he had readily agreed to. So we started with a completely blank slate. We drew a house on a piece of paper, and we said: ‘Is this your home?’ And he said: ‘No! You forgot the gate!’ So we drew a gate. And he said: ‘But you forgot the tree!’ So we drew a tree.  Piece by piece, day by day, we filled in a picture of his home. He was still very reserved and traumatized, so the process took over a month. But we met in the safety of my office every day, and we figured it out. It was like putting together a puzzle. The saddest moment was when we drew his father. ‘You have to draw him laying down,’ the boy said. ‘I tried to get him to come with me, but he wouldn’t.’  When we eventually used the drawings to identify the boy’s hometown and find his mother, she confirmed our fears. The boy had disappeared after seeing his father get shot.”
(Juba, South Sudan)

humansofnewyork:

"When he first came to us, he wasn’t talking. He was about four years old, but we knew nothing else about him. Occasionally, he’d imitate the other children, but he’d express no thoughts of his own. He couldn’t tell us anything about his home, his family, or where he came from. To make matters worse, aid workers had further confused him by suggesting hometowns to him— which he had readily agreed to. So we started with a completely blank slate. We drew a house on a piece of paper, and we said: ‘Is this your home?’ And he said: ‘No! You forgot the gate!’ So we drew a gate. And he said: ‘But you forgot the tree!’ So we drew a tree.
Piece by piece, day by day, we filled in a picture of his home. He was still very reserved and traumatized, so the process took over a month. But we met in the safety of my office every day, and we figured it out. It was like putting together a puzzle. The saddest moment was when we drew his father. ‘You have to draw him laying down,’ the boy said. ‘I tried to get him to come with me, but he wouldn’t.’
When we eventually used the drawings to identify the boy’s hometown and find his mother, she confirmed our fears. The boy had disappeared after seeing his father get shot.”

(Juba, South Sudan)

(Source: animals-are-amazing, via brendamazing)

misty-tears:

awwww-cute:

Moment of bravery at the vet

THIS LITTLE MUNCHKIN OH LORDD

misty-tears:

awwww-cute:

Moment of bravery at the vet

THIS LITTLE MUNCHKIN OH LORDD

(via raquelfromtelevisionrepair)

candidlycara:

My best friend though. 

jtotheizzoe:

All day. Every day.

(Source: thejanewaydirective)

forevercemetery:

if you’re thinking something nice about someone you should always say it

(Source: drakeboner, via inayatstar)

(via candidlycara)

lumos5001:

rawr0609:

garfeildlogan:

this thing w ferguson is making me wonder how many of the historical riots that happened in the 20th century they teach you about in school were actually ‘riots’ ??

I’m scared that in 40 years, I’m gonna have to tell my child what really happened because their textbooks will be full of lies

history is written by the victors

(via candidlycara)

humansofnewyork:

This may be the happiest I’ve ever been to write a post. Last year, as many of you probably remember, we held a crowdfunding campaign to help a family with adoption fees. The Watkins family had already adopted an eight year old daughter from Ethiopia. They were so happy with their new family, they decided to adopt a ten year old boy named Rabuma, who they had discovered in an orphanage. They knew that Rabuma was destined to be their new son, but were heartbroken because they didn’t have the money to bring him home yet. 4,000 of you donated to help make this family a reality. Over the past year, the Watkins have been sending me periodic updates, but I didn’t want to share them because I didn’t want to jeopardize the process. But everything just finalized. By a beautiful coincidence, the Watkins happened to pick up Rabuma while I was in Africa. So between destinations, I took a two hour detour to Ethiopia to photograph the occasion. It was such an honor for me to be present at the birth of this new family. The love that had already developed between them just filled the room.

humansofnewyork:

This may be the happiest I’ve ever been to write a post. Last year, as many of you probably remember, we held a crowdfunding campaign to help a family with adoption fees. The Watkins family had already adopted an eight year old daughter from Ethiopia. They were so happy with their new family, they decided to adopt a ten year old boy named Rabuma, who they had discovered in an orphanage. They knew that Rabuma was destined to be their new son, but were heartbroken because they didn’t have the money to bring him home yet. 4,000 of you donated to help make this family a reality. Over the past year, the Watkins have been sending me periodic updates, but I didn’t want to share them because I didn’t want to jeopardize the process. But everything just finalized. By a beautiful coincidence, the Watkins happened to pick up Rabuma while I was in Africa. So between destinations, I took a two hour detour to Ethiopia to photograph the occasion. It was such an honor for me to be present at the birth of this new family. The love that had already developed between them just filled the room.

foxmouth:

Perpetual Calendar, 2013 | by Arina Pozdnyak

(via starkiller60)